Resource : Captain Cook voyages through The British Library

June 13, 2018 - Richard Moss

The British Library follows the journeys of the man who opened up the world during the Age of Revolution in James Cook: The Voyages Captain James Cook’s name has always been synonymous with exploration and adventure, but even in the 1770s when the American Revolutionary War was underway, such was his fame that none other […]

Resource : Description of a Slave Ship

This print was made to highlight the inhumane conditions under which enslaved Africans were transported across the Atlantic Ocean, forced to make the long voyage from West Africa to the Americas, tightly packed into the hold of ships and held in chains.

Resource : View of New Lanark by John Winning

New Lanark, a village on the River Clyde near Glasgow, was a revolutionary industrial and housing complex, combining a cotton mill with purpose-built housing, education and social care for its workers and their families.

Resource : Nelson’s Coat

This is a Royal Naval undress coat of the standard pattern for 1795-1812, worn by Admiral Lord Horatio Nelson when commanding the British fleet at the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805. In this major naval battle, the British defeated the combined fleets of French and Spanish navies, ending Napoleon's threat to invade Britain. However, Admiral Nelson was shot at the height of the battle and mortally wounded. Ten years later, Napoleon's defeat at Waterloo would end his threat to Britain forever.

Resource : Locomotion No. 1

This is the first steam powered railway engine to run on a public railway. It was designed by George Stephenson and sparked a transport revolution that transformed the lives and fortunes of people across Britain and the wider world.

Resource : A New Map of Africa

In 1805 large tracts of Africa remained unknown in Britain and Europe. Mapmakers were quick to draw on new information to fill the blank spaces on the map.

Resource : Anti-slavery sugar bowl

One of the ways British people tried to challenge slavery, was to stop buying sugar - one of the most profitable products of the Caribbean plantations.