From wild and dramatic mountains to smoke-filled cities, how did late 18th- and 19th-century artists represent the north?

The Paul Mellon lectures

Named in honour of the philanthropist and collector of British art, Paul Mellon, these biennial lectures are given by a distinguished historian of British art.

Tim Barringer, the Paul Mellon Professor and Chair of the Department of the History of Art at Yale University, delivers this year’s lectures.

This five-part lecture series follows British 18th- and 19th-century artists to Australia, the Caribbean, India, and the Americas. Learn how they struggled to adapt landscape traditions to represent the terrain and people they confronted.

Their encounters with other civilisations were often violent and the resulting paintings and prints – by artists such as Richard Wilson, Turner and Frederic Church – were vivid, ambivalent, responses to an often painful history.